We are tired

Police brutality against minorities hasn’t just suddenly increased in America. It’s always been there, modern technology just makes it easier to disprove the lies and refinements of the rotten maggots that populate the halls of power.

It was the police (great grand parents and older) that used to kill and scalp escaped slaves during the 400 years of slavery for profit. It was the police (grandparents of the current generation) that used to allow their families to lynch black people till the 60’s (this barbaric practice only started to be frowned upon in the West during the 50’s.) my dad was born in the 50’s.
It was the police members (parents of the current generation) and chiefs that ran the local kkk chapters, donning the white uniforms at night and the blue ones at day time.
It was these same police chiefs, members of the kkk and active during the civil rights era who retired and whose kids took over and are still there today.
Thesr butchers and white supremacists were never brought to trial, justice was never served. Instead my people have to gaze upon their faces immortalised in sculptures and university mottos, in every walk of life they are reminded that their life is cheap and murderers can get away with it as long as the murdered is black.

This is the result of hundreds of years of state sanctioned ethnic cleansing. But it’s been prettied up and disguised. It’s roots are still showing though, like a bad dye job. ETHNIC CLEANSING.

And you wonder why black people distrut the police. BECAUSE THEY HAVE NEVER BEEN A SYMBOL OF PROTECTION, THEY HAVE ALWAYS BEEN A TOOL OF OPPRESSION.

My solidarity to my brothers and sisters in that country that since its inception has let the collective blood of over a hundred million black and brown bodies. This is why America cannot know peace. It’s hands are bloody and the complicity of whites continues to enable this.

Fuck you and your white privilege that enabled you to sit comfortably behind your computer screen and defend state sanctioned killings.

Fuck you and your white privilege that enabled you to determine that these people’s lives weren’t worth enough to get a fair trial.

Fuck you and your white privilege that enabled you to rationalise the death of a fellow human being even when all the evidence points to them not deserving it time and time again.

Fuck you and your fucking privileged existence that makes you think that we don’t get a right to fair trial because we have rap sheets.

Fuck you and your fucking white privilege that has makes you think that my life is somehow worth less because I have a different level of melanin in my skin.

Infinity fuck you and your white privilege to the point of shuffling off this mortal coil that makes you blind to the fact that these same police captured Dylan roof alive and diffused the Waco shootout without killing a single biker even though they had killed each other.

Eternally fuck you for continuing to enable the despicable actions of the police by removing the humanity of their INNOCENT victims. Being black is not a crime. BEING AN ETHNIC MINORITY IS NOT A FUCKING CRIME and we shouldn’t have to pay with blood.

FUCK YOU

#AltonSterling
#BlackLivesMatter
#TamirRice
#WeDemandJustice
#WeAreNotBloodSacrificesOnTheAltarOfWhiteSupremacy
#EricGarner
#InnocentUntilProvenGuilty
#BlackIsNotACrime
#PhilandoCastile
#ExistingWhileBlack
#EndPoliceBrutality

Colour-Blindness in the modern world

 

Colour-Blindness in the modern world

Thesis

There is a growing trend in the race movement of the modern world to claim a “superior” position of colour blindness which is a destructive stance as it provides an easy way to ignore minority issues for the ethnic majorities and often leads to the belief of reverse racism being real towards whites in western society.

Introduction

Historically speaking, the definition of racism in the minds of the common populace has revolved around the obvious kinds of discrimination, those that call for the killing of coloured people by the local KKK, burning of crosses, refusal to share public space with a minority. These are all the obvious forms of racism that people are aware of. There are however more subtle forms of racism that have entered the public domain in recent years. These insidious forms seem to be growing in terms of general acceptance in the population as opposed to the other more confrontational forms that have slowly and thankfully gone out of favour in modern society. For example, it has become frowned upon by the general population “blacken up” as a way of portraying African/black characters. The use of the word “nigger” is no longer socially acceptable by Caucasians and there are affirmative action policies that are seeking to redress the balance of power held by Caucasians in positions of power as well as in schools and higher learning institutions.

Out of this movement to level the racial playing filed, a growing trend has emerged especially amongst ethnic majorities to take a stance of colour blindness. This ideal, although well-meaning to start with as a legitimate millennial movement against racism in the modern world has now devolved into a catch all phrase which people use. Mainly as a way to discredit the experiences of ethnic minorities in society. It has now become a phrase used to silence the minorities when an accusation of racism, either institutional or racial bias, are seen in a situation. This stance claims that the person who holds the view does not see colour and as such cannot be accused of racism as said person treats all races equally.

The phrase has most recently been used extensively and heavily by Caucasians against African-Americans fighting for an end to the institutional racism that exists in the American justice system. It has become a way of shutting down discord during conversations, by immediately stating that they treat everyone equally. This stance is an admirable stance to have, especially by ethnic majorities. The problem with this stance however, is the fact that we do not live in a post-racial world.

 

Body

The stance of colour blindness is problematic to say the least and regressive as a movement against racism. It renders the people who utter the phrase blind, figuratively to the struggles of the ethnic minorities. It invalidates their pain and assumes that they start life on a level playing field with Caucasians. In this essay, I will attempt to trace the roots of the word which began as a movement against racism; from the beginning of the civil rights movement to the birth of the millennials and the ideals of a post racial world being superimposed in a race dominated world, and the claims that reverse racism is real towards Caucasians.

For centuries in the west, mainly in North America, ethnic minorities, especially African-American people were victimized, enslaved, brutalized and were owned as property. After the abolishment of slavery, the status quo did not change much for centuries after with African-Americans being denied decent schools, hospitals and decent government services. This led to a majority being uneducated and stuck in a cycle of poverty for generations. As a result extreme poverty continued to dominate the lives of the minorities and most led the lives of share croppers and maids, not far from conditions that their grandfathers experienced as slaves centuries before.

Schools and public services in America especially were segregated to black and white schools until the famous Brown vs Board of education, 347 U.S. 483 in 1954. It ruled that state laws establishing separate public schools for black and white students were unconstitutional. The decision overturned a previous decision, Plessy v. Ferguson which allowed state-sponsored segregation in pubic education. This ruling in 1954 was a major victory to the civil rights movement and paved the way for racial integration in schools.[1]

Full racial integration was not achieved until after the civil rights act of 1964 was passed a decade later.[2]  This led the way for the rise of affirmative action policies being extended to African-Americans in a bid to redress the atrocities of the past. Unfortunately however, this has given rise to the myth that African-Americans gain the most out of other under-privileged groups as a result of the policies and it is frequently used as a way of belittling the achievements of African Americans in society today.

As Anthony M. Platt put it in his paper on the rise and fall of affirmative action, this policy was not originally intended for African-Americans, it was introduced as government initiated intervention to stop injustices against individuals or groups whose suffering was not self-inflicted; to correct the injustices caused by systemic discrimination; and to prevent its recurrence. Such a broad definition meant that people of different classes, ethnicities, racial designation, gender and sexuality who had been denied rights based on these factors were covered by the policy.[3]

It can be deduced from this definition of affirmative action that the majority of people who benefited from this policy were certainly not African-Americans but mainly white lower class Americans. In fact according to the United States labour department, the primary beneficiaries of affirmative action have been white women. The department estimates that 6 million women workers are in higher occupational classifications today than they would have been without affirmative action policies.[4]

As a result of this perceived injustice in affirmative action policies, counter protest groups sprung up, rejecting the ideas behind it. Their main grudge was the misguided opinion that African-Americans have to do less and achieve less compared to their white counterparts. They argued that the university policies of reserving places specifically for ethnic minorities from under-privileged backgrounds was a form of discrimination. Their claim was based upon the ideas that living in a post-racial world at the end of the civil rights movement meant that no special treatment should be given to any one race. They argued that it was reverse discrimination against whites. And this movement was bolstered by some former liberal scholars who published books in the early 90’s criticising Affirmative Action as a negative policy.

According to them, Affirmative action and other colour-conscious policies betrayed the original goals of the Civil Rights Act and the Voting Rights Act. They saw it as a perversion of the colour-blind society promise. They saw it as a colour-blind policy of antidiscrimination being transformed into a policy of compensatory justice.[5]

Advocates of this movement have been called racial realists by Professor Alan Wolfe [6] in his book review of “Someone else’s house” in 1998. An extract from his review is below:

“In the past few years, however, there has emerged a challenge to the liberal consensus among liberals (or former liberals…they are united on two important points. One is that whites have not resisted demands for racial justice but have accepted tremendous progress in race relations. The other is that those who claim to speak in the name of African-Americans do not always serve the interests of those for whom they supposedly speak.” [7]

The books Alan Wolfe criticise in his review put the blame of continued racial segregation on the shoulders of civil rights leaders like the Reverend Jesse Jackson and Al Sharpton who were public and vocal supporters of Affirmative Action policies and pursued race-conscious solutions to societal problems.

This played into a new feeling in the white community of reverse racism as well as a victim mentality in which they refused to see or acknowledge the still heavily racialized world we live in today. In a way, they rebelled against the status quo by pursuing a different, if misguided movement against racism.  The demographics that felt this the most were the “millennials”, those that had gone to universities with ethnic minorities and had seen affirmative action policies at the universities they attended. This group perceived themselves as the victims in a world which was increasingly catering to just ethnic minorities. The belief that racism didn’t exist anymore and affirmative action policies were unfair to them in a post racial world was and is widespread amongst this demographic. This was the beginning of the Colour-blind movement in mainstream society. [8]

As Joe Kincheloe put it in 1998, this idea or “benign” response works to deny and, therefore, erase the identity of the subject(s) of the response. According to him, Colour-blindness is a luxury that only those who are very secure in position of whiteness and power can have. This idea ignores the treatment that many people of colour encounter. Together, the defensiveness and denial of this “benign” response function to maintain the status quo while absolving the white reactor’s responsibility for any bias to race that him/herself carries[9]

As many scholars have pointed out, the myth of reverse racism has become a tool by the oppressors to oppress the minorities. Through claims of colour blindness and the rejection of affirmative action policies due to the myth of it conferring an unfair advantage on a group, whites in America especially choose to go down the route of subtle racism.[10]

Conclusion

The idea of colour blindness started out as a noble, if slightly skewed way of dealing with racial inequality by treating everyone as if they started on a level playing field. Its roots were indeed noble as a movement against racism in the modern world. However, over time the movement has morphed into one of the single biggest racial challenges in the modern world and as the views become entrenched, it becomes more of a stumbling block to the minorities it claims to help by being impartial. It is an idea that can only work in a post racial world where everyone starts life on equal footing. Unfortunately, we know this to be untrue, the criminal justice system is still heavily biased towards whites and against blacks to the extent that whole books have been written on the subject in the dawn of the new Millennia[11].

As a result of this, its proponents, whilst claiming not to see race, choose to discredit the voice of minorities that protest the unfair advantages at the start of life conferred upon individuals based on the virtue of their race. In this way, this movement that started as a movement against racism has now devolved into a blind movement that impedes the people it proclaims to help due to continued ring fencing of white privilege. Or as Lopez put it; the current trend of colour blindness allows racial remediation while protecting the status quo[12]

Footnotes

[1] Hartford, Bruce. n.d. 1954. Accessed November 15, 2015. http://www.crmvet.org/tim/timhis54.htm#1954bvbe

[2] “Civil Rights Act 1964”. 2015. In The Hutchinson Unabridged Encyclopedia with Atlas and Weather Guide. Abington: Helicon. http://search.credoreference.com/content/entry/heliconhe/civil_rights_act_1964/0

[3] Anthony M. Platt, The Rise and Fall of Affirmative Action, 11 Notre Dame J.L. Ethics & Pub. Pol’y 67 (1997). Available at: http://scholarship.law.nd.edu/ndjlepp/vol11/iss1/4

[4] University, North Carolina State. 2010. NC State University Affirmative Action in Employment Training. Accessed November 18, 2015. https://www.ncsu.edu/project/oeo-training/aa/beneficiaries.htm

[5] Brown, Michael K. Whitewashing Race: The Myth of a Color-Blind Society.( Berkeley: University of California Press, 2003), 169.

[6] Political Science Department, Boston College. 2015. Alan Wolfe. 20 November. Accessed November 23, 2015. http://www.bc.edu/schools/cas/polisci/facstaff/wolfe.html

[7] Wolfe, Alan. 1998. Enough Blame to Go Around. Book Review, New York: The New York Times.

[8] Carr, L. (1997). “Color-blind” racism. (Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications)

[9] Kincheloe, Joe L. White Reign : Deploying Whiteness in America. 1st ed. (New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1998).

[10] Anderson, Kristin J. Benign Bigotry : The Psychology of Subtle Prejudice. (Cambridge, UK ; New York: Cambridge University Press, 2010.)

[11] Bell, Derrick A. Race, Racism, and American Law. 4th ed. (Gaithersburg, MD: Aspen Law & Business, 2000.)

[12] Haney Lopez, Ian. “Colorblind to the Reality of Race in America.” The Chronicle of Higher Education 53, no. 11 (2006): B.6-B9. (Pgs 1-2)

“This Is What They Did For Fun”: The Story Of A Modern-Day Lynching – BuzzFeed News

I came across this article on a break from writing my essay (funnily enough, my thesis asks: Why is the practice of colour blindness amongst ethnic majorities as a way to deal with racial inequality such a problem in the modern world?). I’m in the mood to rant, I am angry at the injustices. If you’re not ready for this, then click away.

 

Craig Anderson was headed home to celebrate his birthday with his partner. Instead, he became the victim of a brutal and violent form of racism that many in Mississippi had thought long gone.

Source: “This Is What They Did For Fun”: The Story Of A Modern-Day Lynching – BuzzFeed News

 

An excerpt from the article:

 

“Sarah Graves’ mother, Mary Miles Harvey, wrote a letter to the court saying that she didn’t raise her daughter to be a racist. At Graves’ sentencing hearing, Judge Harvey Wingate called Harvey to the witness stand to ask her about the letter. He noted that Graves had told investigators that when her and her brother’s rooms were messy, Harvey would tell them they were “living like niggers.” Harvey denied saying that.
“I would have said Negroes, not niggers,” she said. “I just meant that their rooms were nasty, like a pigsty.”
Wingate asked her what she thought the word “nigger” meant.
“An ignorant, nasty person,” Harvey said. “I was taught in school that a nigger was a nasty person, and a Negro was a black person.”
I thank my lucky stars daily that I’m not African American. WHen they protest institutional racism and violence, people tell them they’re too sensitive.

They tell us as black people that we’re seeing racism in everything. We’re too sensitive, we use the card too much. We’re too quick to call it racism

Imagine this happening 5,000 times over to your grandfathers, rapes on an unimaginable scale to your grandmothers. The perpetrators getting off scot free, and in some cases becoming respected members of society.

We like to think that the plight of black people ended with the end of the slave trade centuries ago, but we conveniently ignore the fact that these people were still to all intents and purposes treated as animals till just over 50 years ago.

And in some “modern countries” institutional racism still exists. We tell ourselves to never forget the Holocaust, never forget the Great War.

In the same vein we tell blacks to get over half a millennium of slavery, jim crow, segregation, exploitation, pillage and barbaric acts committed against them.

The Belgians were cutting off hands of indigenous citizens (including very young children) in the mid 1900’s. The British committed atrocities against the Mau Mau in Kenya in the last half a century. The mere thought of brining up what the white Afrikaners perpetuated against the natives is enough to bring tears to my eyes.

 

When I talk about racism, people tell me to shut up, to not always play the race card, to give it a rest. They talk about how black people have been “free” now for years and we still commit the highest proportion of crimes in developed countries. They lean on these excuses of blacks being violent and uncivilised. It’s their crutch. It’s their way of burying their heads in the sand like the proverbial ostrich. They pretend we live in a post-racial world

They forget that intergenerational trauma exists. If we accept intergenerational trauma for non POC (WW1&2 survivors and Holocaust survivors). Why do we ignore it as a factor in the issues affecting blacks now, especially in North America. Why do we ignore the trauma caused by segregation and centuries of White power in the form of the KKK terrorising black people? Why do we ignore the effects of racism that has meant less funding for schools in deprived areas? Less funding for services committed to the mental well being of POC? Why do white people ignore this?

 

WHY do I as a black person have to be “dignified” and “respectable” when protesting the deaths of:

Dontre Hamilton (Milwaukee)

Eric Garner (New York)

John Crawford III (Dayton, Ohio)

Michael Brown Jr. (Ferguson, Missouri)

Ezell Ford (Florence, California)

Dante Parker (Victorville, California)

Tanisha Anderson (Cleveland)

Akai Gurley (Brooklyn, New York)

Tamir Rice (Cleveland)

Rumain Brisbon (Phoenix)

Jerame Reid (Bridgeton, New Jersey)

Tony Robinson (Madison, Wisconsin)

Phillip White (Vineland, New Jersey)

Eric Harris (Tulsa, Oklahoma)

Walter Scott (North Charleston, South Carolina)

Freddie Gray (Baltimore)

But you  can throw a riot when your team loses and its alright?

Why can the detestable womam quoted above feel free to say such things in a court of law as proof her daughter was not raised a racist? YES I KNOW, NOT ALL WHITE PEOPLE.

 

But if the screams I hear on the internet are to be believed, a vocal minority are tarnishing the ‘good name’ of a silent majority of the race. WHy don’t the silent majority rise up and show the world that these racist bigots and hate crimes are not supported by them? Why dont they come out and strongly oppose these crimes? Why don’t they take responsibility? This is ironically a charge the white majority has levelled against the muslim community time and time again after terrorist attacks.

Race relations in America

So to commemorate my new blog, I decided to repost a rant I had on facebook a while back. I don’t have the time currently to write a blog, even if I do make one whist I was supposed to be revising for my 11 exams 🙈.
I promise I will get round to posting actual blogs but for now my first post will be a repost of a rant *sorry*. But it’s relevant as ever in the wake of the #BaltimoreRiots; enjoy…

The whole justice system in America needs reform. The same young officers that were holding the water cannons and unleashing the dogs during the Civil rights movement are now heads of police departments. The same officers involved in Selma, Alabama boycotts etc are now police chiefs, sheriffs, heads of crime units.
The same young members of the kkk during segregation are now senior officers in the police and judiciary. If they did this in their youth, what makes us think that they’ll take the killing of unarmed black men seriously?
The end of segregation should not have been the end of the Civil rights movement. It should have been the platform to launch into phase two. The end of Jim crow laws and black laws and segregation did not mean the end of racism. These people just stuffed their hate, prejudice, racism, kkk membership into sacks. These sacks have now frayed over the resulting decades.
Obama having the audacity as a POC to become  president loosened the neck of the sack significantly, after all he should have stayed in his lane according to Fox news and the GOP. and now all the hate is pouring out from the moth holes and gaping frayed edges of that sack.

It’s there for all to see, the Republicans and tea party don’t hide their racism, the police don’t hide their face when they kill, the judges don’t flick when they hand down disproportionate sentences for POC compared to Caucasians.
That country is rotten to the core and the stench cannot be hidden with the perfume of “post racial world/I don’t see colour” utopia some like to perpetuate.